heal diabetes – Diabetic Kitchen https://diabetickitchen.com Sun, 19 Jul 2020 16:24:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Don’t Let Fake Sugar Fool You – it’s Dangerous, Too! https://diabetickitchen.com/fake-sugar-is-dangerous-too/ https://diabetickitchen.com/fake-sugar-is-dangerous-too/#comments Tue, 27 Aug 2019 23:00:21 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4558

Nearly half of American adults consume artificial sweeteners on a daily basis. Not because they prefer the taste, but for the lack of calories. If something has less calories, it must be healthier… right? “Real” sugar is dangerous to your health, so artificial sweeteners must be better for you… right? Wrong on both counts! While some ...

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Nearly half of American adults consume artificial sweeteners on a daily basis. Not because they prefer the taste, but for the lack of calories. If something has less calories, it must be healthier… right? “Real” sugar is dangerous to your health, so artificial sweeteners must be better for you… right? Wrong on both counts!

While some may have heard rumblings of how artificial sweeteners are unhealthy, most have no idea the incredibly negative impacts these chemicals have on the body. It’s time to talk about some of the lesser known evils of these fake sugars.

The majority of artificial sweetener consumers do so in an effort to lose weight. However, research is now showing that not only do artificial sweeteners prevent weight loss, they actually encourage weight gain!

Researchers at the University of Manitoba found that artificial, zero-calorie sweeteners had no consistent link to decreased body weight. Neither were there reductions in body mass index (BMI) or waist size. Instead, consumption of artificial sweeteners leads to weight gain. What causes this?

Artificial sweeteners prompt ‘reward’ signals in the brain. Just like with real sugar, the brain can become dependent and crave more. This can lead to increased consumption of higher calorie foods, causing weight gain.

Next, the taste buds can be deadened by artificial sweeteners. They affect our sense of what tastes ‘sweet’ and what does not. We can then be more likely to consume foods that contain sugar, making it nearly impossible to manage diabetes. I don’t know about you, but I’d rather taste the food I’m eating. Especially if I’m putting in so much effort to make good food choices!

Thirdly, individuals think that with a zero-calorie sweetener, they have calories to spare. This can encourage indulgence in foods (and portion sizes.) Quite frankly, packing on pounds has never sounded easier.

In case you didn’t catch that – these chemicals literally manipulate our brains, people! What’s worse, the damage doesn’t end with manipulation. Artificial sweeteners like Aspartame can increase risk for several chronic, even fatal diseases.

Aspartame (the leading artificial sweetener in diet sodas) has been linked to increased risk of cancers of the liver, lungs, brain, breast, and prostate. Not to mention increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Does anyone know the number one cause of death for diabetics? Heart disease.

Speaking of diabetics, many turn to diet sodas because they do not contain sugar. However, research has found no difference in diabetes risk between those who consumed a ‘diet’ drink and those who consumed a beverage sweetened with actual sugar.

Let’s state that again. There was no reduction in diabetes risk between individuals who consume sugar-sweetened drinks and those who consume artificially-sweetened drinks. Risk of heart attack was equal among those who drank traditional sugar-sweetened beverages and those who drank artificially-sweetened ones.

Researchers also found that those who drink artificially-sweetened beverages have double the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is an extremely dangerous condition consisting of high blood sugar, elevated blood pressure, unstable cholesterol levels, and excess body fat around the waist. Metabolic syndrome greatly increases one’s risk of heart attack, cardiovascular disease, and stroke.

Multiple research studies have also concluded that artificial sweeteners like Aspartame damage the neurological system. Aspartame has been found to damage brain cells and disrupt neuron function. Declines in learning ability and in emotional function have also been observed by researchers.

Alzheimer’s dementia is a heart-breaking disease. It robs an individual of their memories, decision making capabilities, the ability to communicate and even complete the most basic activities of daily living. Guess what? Artificial sweeteners like Aspartame increase risk of Alzheimer’s dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Even when only consuming half of the FDA-approved “safe” amount of Aspartame, research participants experienced increased irritation, a decline in spatial orientation, and more frequent occurrences of depressive behavior. In 1993, study participants had such severe, negative responses to Aspartame, that the experiment had to be halted. Researchers recommended anyone with a history of mood disorders to avoid Aspartame completely due to the severity of the reactions observed in this study.

Along with our brains, the kidneys also have to process this poison. In individuals with initially healthy kidney function, drinking diet sodas was associated with a 30% greater reduction in kidney function compared to individuals who do not drink diet sodas. The study included over 3,000 participants and spanned 20 years.

How about a disease that affects the entire body? Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder, with over 6 million sufferers here in the U.S. alone. Researchers found that by eliminating Aspartame and MSG (monosodium glutamate), participants enjoyed near complete relief of their symptoms in a matter of months. If participants consumed either ingredient after the study… fibromyalgia symptoms quickly returned.

Autism spectrum disorders are becoming more common every day, with researchers and physicians alike still scrambling to isolate the cause. One study found that women who were exposed to a chemical called dietary methanol (present in artificial sweeteners like Aspartame) had a significantly increased likelihood of giving birth to a child who developed autism.

So, with all of this research, how have artificial sweeteners remained so popular?  People still think they are making a ‘healthier choice.’ (The cheerfully colorful TV commercials certainly aren’t helping matters, either!)

The big manufacturers couldn’t be happier. They’ve spent millions in marketing their products as healthy alternatives to sugar. Their wallets are full, while our risk for deadly heath issues skyrockets. So, what’s the answer? Natural, zero-calorie sweeteners like monkfruit and stevia are a far safer choice.

The biggest key to long-term health is simple – eat real food. Quality nutrition means you get the best of both worlds; enjoying the healthy life we’re all striving for, while eating delicious food. And there’s absolutely nothing “artificial” about that!

 

 

Sources:

https://www.livescience.com/64411-sugar-substitutes-health-benefits.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8373935

www.draxe.com/nutrition/article/aspartame

 

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Discover the Power of Fiber – A Diabetic’s Ultimate BFF! https://diabetickitchen.com/fiber-a-diabetics-ultimate-bff/ https://diabetickitchen.com/fiber-a-diabetics-ultimate-bff/#respond Thu, 08 Aug 2019 18:39:06 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4552

Fiber – what’s not to love? Found in a variety of foods, fiber is crucial to good health. This is especially true for individuals with diabetes. In fact, fiber actively helps to lower blood glucose. Fiber has a strong effect on gut bacteria and encourages them to multiply. Believe it or not, this is good ...

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Fiber – what’s not to love? Found in a variety of foods, fiber is crucial to good health. This is especially true for individuals with diabetes.

In fact, fiber actively helps to lower blood glucose. Fiber has a strong effect on gut bacteria and encourages them to multiply. Believe it or not, this is good news! There are an estimated 100 trillion bacteria present in the human gut; some good, some bad.

The more good bacteria in the gut, the better! Researchers credit fiber for increasing the good bacteria in the gut, causing the gut to become more acidic. This acidity not only reduces the number of bad bacteria present, it causes the body to ramp up insulin production. Hence fiber’s reputation for lowering blood sugar!

One study found just how powerful a high fiber diet can be. Half of the research participants consumed a standard diet. The other half consumed a similar diet but with high levels of dietary fiber included.

After 12 weeks, the high-fiber diet participants reduced their 3-month average blood sugar levels. They also enjoyed a faster and larger reduction in their fasting blood glucose numbers. Plus, they lost significantly more weight than the standard diet participants.

Are the benefits of fiber blowing your mind? Speaking of minds, research has found that fiber increases the production of a fatty acid that helps to prevent brain inflammation. Protecting brain health has never been more important, especially for diabetics.

Nearly 5.5 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s dementia. This progressive brain disease destroys an individual’s memory, decision-making abilities, and communication skills. One out of every eight individuals over the age of 65 has Alzheimer’s.

One out of every two individuals over the age of 85 have the disease. As the baby-boomer generation ages, Alzheimer’s diagnosis rates are going to skyrocket. Research has now proven a link between diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

When blood sugar is too high, the extra sugar causes damage to nerves and organs in the body. Damage to blood vessels in the brain, along with the inflammation caused by high blood sugar, can also encourage the development of the disease. Advancing research, however, gives hope in the fight against brain aging – eat more fiber! Yes, fiber has been found to slow brain aging and help prevent cognitive decline.

Believe it or not, the benefits of fiber don’t end there. Due to the gut’s powerful impact on health and wellness, it is now being referred to as the body’s “second brain.” In fact, 80% of the body’s immune function is in the gut!

Of particular interest to diabetics, chronic inflammation is initiated in the gut, as well. This is not the same as acute inflammation, which goes away fairly quickly. Such as the swelling that occurs when you stub your toe, or get bitten by a mosquito.

Chronic inflammation develops over time due to the body’s continual fight against harmful substances. Or in some cases, the body’s immune system begins attacking healthy cells instead of the harmful ones. Either way, chronic inflammation is not only harmful, it can be deadly.

Diabetics need to be especially mindful in the prevention of chronic inflammation. This is because long-term, uncontrolled high blood sugar causes inflammation throughout the body. Unfortunately, that’s not the worst of it.

Research has found that inflammation is the root cause of many debilitating diseases. Chronic inflammation has been connected to the development of some of the world’s deadliest illnesses – cancer, heart disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and digestive disease.

Did you know the number one killer of diabetics is not high blood sugar? It’s heart disease. Diabetics must focus on heart health, as well as, regulation of blood sugar. Fiber’s effects on the gut encourage the stabilization of blood sugar, promote gut health, and help reduce the risk of chronic inflammation.

Ready to eat some fiber yet? The American Heart Association recommends total fiber intake to be 25-30 grams per day. The average person eats only 15 grams per day. That’s barely half the recommended amount. Let’s review a few foods rich in fiber (and in flavor!)

Artichokes – Low in calories, rich in fiber and essential nutrients, artichokes are a great addition to your diet. Just one medium artichoke accounts for nearly half of the recommend daily fiber intake for women, and a third for men.

Avocado – One cup of avocado has more than 15 grams of fiber, plus an abundance of heart-healthy omega-3 fats! There are endless, delicious ways to use avocado, too. Rather than putting chicken salad on a bun, put it inside one half of an avocado. Instead of mayonnaise on your turkey sandwich, try mashed avocado.

Beans and Lentils – One cup of cooked red kidney beans contains 13 grams of fiber, a cup of black beans has 15 grams of fiber, and white beans contain over 18 grams per cup. In addition to their high fiber content, beans, as well as lentils (which are composed of 40% fiber), contain a starch that is more slowly absorbed into the bloodstream, helping to keep blood sugar stable.

Berries – Loaded with fiber and antioxidants, fresh raspberries and blackberries top the list with more than 7 grams of fiber per cup. Blueberries are also a great source of vitamins and soluble fiber. Studies have found that glucose levels reduce over time when blueberries are included in one’s diet. In fact, one study by the USDA, consuming 2 ½ cups of fresh blueberry juice per day lowered blood glucose levels, improved depression symptoms, and sharpened memory.

Brownies – WHAT? Yep! One of these chocolatey, delicious brownies contains 6 grams of soluble fiber.

Fiber is of utmost importance to health, for diabetics especially. Maybe its fiber’s ability to help stabilize and lower blood sugar? Or maybe due to its assistance in preventing brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s? Not to mention fiber’s incredible impact on the gut, and therefore, the entire body.

Fiber is our friend. Lucky for us, it comes in all sorts of delicious forms and foods. Now go get your fiber on!

 

Public Service Announcement: while it is true that these high-fiber foods are good for you, they can also give you gas, along with intestinal cramping or bloating if you’re not used to higher fiber. Don’t take on too much at once. Instead, gradually introduce more fiber to your diet over time.

Stephanie Johnson has a masters degree from the University of Central Florida and is a Certified Nutrition & Wellness Consultant.

Sources:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321150.php

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2018.01832/full

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2018/01/just-eat-more-fiber/550082/

https://www.health.news/2018-01-11-science-confirms-inflammation-is-the-cause-of-almost-all-disease.html

 

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Check Out These Secrets for Better Blood Sugar Control https://diabetickitchen.com/secrets-for-better-blood-sugar-control/ https://diabetickitchen.com/secrets-for-better-blood-sugar-control/#respond Thu, 08 Aug 2019 18:19:35 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4543

You may think you’re doing everything possible to lower your blood sugar. While essential, avoiding sugar is only one part of managing diabetes. There are many more ‘secret’ strategies we should be using on our journey to better health. Read on to take control of your diabetes and enjoy more stable blood sugar for good! ...

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You may think you’re doing everything possible to lower your blood sugar. While essential, avoiding sugar is only one part of managing diabetes. There are many more ‘secret’ strategies we should be using on our journey to better health. Read on to take control of your diabetes and enjoy more stable blood sugar for good!

Firstly, the age-old adage is true – knowledge is power. Learn as much as you can about diabetes and its effects on the body. That information will enable you to make the best choices for your health.

Speaking of knowledge, its important to work closely with your healthcare team. Talk with your physician about the information you’ve learned. For example, you’ve read how regular exercise can help lower blood sugar. You’d like to start an exercise regimen, but aren’t sure where to begin. Speak with your physician about your desired exercise plan so he or she can make sure you’re good to go.

Your physician may also recommend a consultation with a dietician or nutritional counselor. These professionals are clinically trained in how food affects the body, and blood glucose levels. If the opportunity to consult with a dietary professional becomes available, embrace it!

When trying to figure out nutrition, the sheer volume of available information is overwhelming. When it comes down to it, we are what we eat. Literally! The body’s cells are made up of the foods we consume. Food is fuel. (That doesn’t mean it can’t be enjoyable and taste amazing!)

There are three main components to building a healthy meal. Fat + fiber + protein = stable blood sugar. Meals should include a balance of all three. Following a high-fat, high-fiber, moderate-protein, low-carb diet has been found to have a dramatic, positive effect on blood sugar.

Sources of healthy fat include avocado, nuts, fatty fish like salmon, even full-fat dairy. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are essential in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure. Fat is not the enemy of health. It’s actually the key to obtaining and maintaining health!

The only fats to be concerned about are trans fats. Trans fats are very dangerous and should be avoided. However, by eliminating deep fried and processed/packaged foods from one’s diet, encountering trans fats becomes far less likely.

Let’s move on to fiber, the unsung hero of diabetes management. Fiber has long been valued for gut regularity. Its positive effects for diabetics, however, are a more recent revelation. Fiber stabilizes blood glucose levels by slowing the processing and absorption of sugars into the bloodstream. This makes fiber an absolute must in a diabetic’s diet.

Good sources of fiber include artichokes, avocados, beans and lentils, nuts, veggies, fresh berries, and quinoa. Notice anything else about those high-fiber foods? That’s right! They are all lower on the glycemic index, and have their fiber contents to thank for it.

Protein is also very important when eating healthfully. Sufficient protein intake is absolutely essential to body function. However, it is crucial to consume protein in appropriate portions, and in the right combinations with healthy fats and fiber.

High protein consumption was popularized by the Atkins diet many years ago. However, research has since found that a diet high in protein is not the way to go. The human body actually converts excess protein into glucose. This means that when we consume too much protein, the body processes the extra as it would carbs… or sugar. Sad, but true.

Good sources of protein include grass-fed beef, wild caught seafood, along with free-range poultry and eggs. Full-fat Greek yogurt, nuts and seeds, even broccoli are fantastic sources of non-meat protein.

You’re going to need that fuel for our next blood sugar-stabilizing secret. Get moving… literally! Regular physical activity contributes nearly countless positive effects on your health. Especially for those with diabetes. It helps your body make the best use of insulin and glucose. In fact, exercise can reduce blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours after working out!

Regular physical activity lowers blood pressure, improves circulation, and helps control cholesterol levels. This reduces risk of heart attack and stroke. Exercise also helps to strengthen muscles and bones, along with burning extra body fat. It’s a great way to boost energy levels and reduce stress, too! Research has shown that even a short walk each day can make a major difference in your health.

You likely knew that nutrition and exercise have huge impacts on diabetes. Did you know sleep quality and stress levels do, too? When the body does not get enough sleep, it’s response mimics insulin resistance. Not only does lack of sleep make you cranky, it also contributes to higher blood sugar.

Avoiding stress is impossible. For diabetics, however, its very important to manage. Cortisol, a “stress hormone” floods the body when we experience stress.

When cortisol is released, the body’s cells either absorb extra glucose for immediate energy, or direct the cells to store it for later. Frequent high cortisol levels contribute to insulin resistance and higher blood sugar levels over time. Getting consistent, quality sleep while reducing stress may seem near to impossible, but both are absolutely essential to stabilizing blood sugar.

Our final secret to managing diabetes is acknowledging that you cannot (and should not) attempt to go it alone. Surround yourself with a good support system. Family, friends, healthcare team, support groups, online chat communities, etc. Anyone who can be a source of encouragement and accountability.

Managing blood sugar and healing diabetes shouldn’t be thought of as a secretive, complicated process. By balancing the foods we eat with regular physical activity, quality sleep, managing stress, and a maintaining good support system, stable blood sugar is achievable. Yes, lower blood sugar and better health require effort. The healthy, happy life we all desire is the reward, and that’s quite a good return on investment!

 

 

Sources:

https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/manage-blood-sugar-18/prevent-sugar-spikes

https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/fats/trans-fat

https://www.health.com/syndication/walking-after-eating-good-for-you

 

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If You’re Looking To Prevent Weight Gain – Go Nuts! https://diabetickitchen.com/prevent-weight-gain-go-nuts/ https://diabetickitchen.com/prevent-weight-gain-go-nuts/#comments Mon, 08 Jul 2019 20:50:09 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4223

Nuts – one of the most underrated foods when it comes to improving one’s health. Especially for those trying to improve heart health and diabetes. Achieving a healthy body weight is also a struggle for many on their journey to better health. Research has found that nuts can also be helpful in maintaining a healthy ...

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Nuts – one of the most underrated foods when it comes to improving one’s health. Especially for those trying to improve heart health and diabetes. Achieving a healthy body weight is also a struggle for many on their journey to better health. Research has found that nuts can also be helpful in maintaining a healthy weight.

One study found that consuming 1 ounce of nus in exchange of other less nutritious foods reduced participants’ risk of weight gain and obesity. The foods replaced by the nuts in this study included French fries, potato chips, or desserts. Even better, not only were those results positive in the short-term, but after a 4 year follow up period, as well!

Nuts are an excellent source of healthy fats, packing a seriously positive punch to your health. Research has shown that by eating a diet rich in good fats, you can actually lower your risk not only for obesity, but for heart disease, diabetes, and high cholesterol.

According to several studies, it is not the amount of fat you eat that affects health, it is the type of fat. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids are two “good fats.” These fats aid in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure levels, thereby, reducing risk of heart disease.  Let’s review a few of the most popular nut varieties and highlight their health benefits.

Packed full of healthy fats, fiber, and antioxidants, almonds are hard to beat from a nutritional standpoint. Almonds are also an excellent source of vitamin E. Research connects vitamin E to a reduced risk of diseases like Alzheimer’s, heart disease, even some cancers.

A bonus for diabetics – research has shown that almonds may contribute to better blood sugar control. Scientists believe these results are due to the high concentration of magnesium found in almonds. Some type II diabetics also have low magnesium levels. In one study, participants with type 2 diabetes who had low magnesium levels took a magnesium supplement. A connection was found between higher magnesium levels and improved insulin resistance.

Healthy fats are all the rage these days, as studies continue to validate the importance of making them a bigger part of our diets. Just one quarter cup of walnuts provides more than the daily recommended amount of omega-3 fats!  Walnuts also contain the amino acid l-arginine, which offers multiple vascular benefits. Individuals who are at increased risk of heart disease, or those who have already been diagnosed with heart disease benefit most.

These Low-Carb Buffalo Almonds will be a hit at your next football or holiday party!

Walnuts are a superfood in their own right! They contain several powerful antioxidants, most of which are not found together in other commonly consumed foods. Research has shown that walnuts may help reduce risk of some cancers. Walnuts in particular help both men and women maintain a healthier weight.

This crisp and crunchy Arugula, Radicchio, and Fennel Salad is a fantastic way to work walnuts into your next meal!

Don’t forget the pistachio! These addictive little jewels are better for you than the average snack. One study found that eating between two and three ounces of pistachios per day lowered levels of bad cholesterol and improved blood lipid levels. Research has also shown that pistachios help stabilize blood sugar after eating a high-carb meal. Pistachios are also credited with improvements in blood vessel and body motor function.

While snacking on pistachios right out of the bag is completely acceptable, this recipe for Pistachio Crusted Scallops is a great way to showcase their salty flavor!

Whether almonds, walnuts, or pistachios, nuts are an excellent addition to your diet. Not only are they delicious and versatile in many types of recipes, they are just plain good for you. Reduced risk of obesity and weight gain, better heart health, lower blood sugar, the list of benefits goes on and on. We hope this information inspires you to get out there and go nuts!

 

 

 

Source:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323577.php

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These Colorful Foods Improve Immunity https://diabetickitchen.com/colorful-foods-improve-immunity/ https://diabetickitchen.com/colorful-foods-improve-immunity/#respond Tue, 25 Jun 2019 14:49:06 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4441

Eating for immunity. While the concept may sound strange, it’s true! The foods we eat can have a huge impact on how our immune systems keep us healthy. How you ask? An astounding 80% of the body’s immune system is in the gut. In order for our digestive and immune systems to function best, a ...

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Eating for immunity. While the concept may sound strange, it’s true! The foods we eat can have a huge impact on how our immune systems keep us healthy. How you ask?

An astounding 80% of the body’s immune system is in the gut. In order for our digestive and immune systems to function best, a number of nutrients are required. Fats, carbs, protein, vitamins and minerals are all essential.

Unfortunately, many individuals are consuming fast food, processed and packaged junk foods. Let alone the soft drinks, and massive amounts of sugar and salt. The diet of the average American is the main reason why our country is so sick. The body is getting no quality fuel with which to fight off illness and disease.

So what can we do about it? A balanced diet of fresh, whole foods is the way to go! Some of the most nutritious foods are also the most colorful. The beautiful, bright colors of fresh vegetables and fruits are indicative of their immune boosting qualities.

Brightly colored citrus fruits like oranges, lemons, limes, and grapefruits get a lot of credit for their Vitamin C content. You’ve probably heard that Vitamin C can help prevent or shorten a cold. Did you know that Vitamin C helps your immune system work well even when you aren’t sick? Scientists believe that Vitamin C increases the number of white blood cells in the bloodstream. These white blood cells fight infection and other free radicals in the body helping to strengthen immunity.

Citrus fruits do contain sugar, natural though it may be. They are very high on the glycemic scale, so should be consumed in moderation. Try a few fresh, juicy orange wedges on top of a spinach salad with bacon and goat cheese. Yum!

Don’t let unexpected sources of Vitamin C like bell peppers, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower pass you by. Their fiber content also helps to stabilize blood sugar. Raw bell pepper slices dipped in guacamole, or creamy, decadent almost mac n cheese are two delicious ways to get a boost of Vitamin C! The human body does not produce its own Vitamin C, so enjoy a little every day to help prevent illness.

Bright, fresh berries pack a serious antioxidant punch to power the immune system. Antioxidants help the body fight off and protect against free radical damage. Vitamins A, C, and E are actually classified as antioxidants. Enjoy fresh berries with Greek yogurt and a drizzle of honey for a delicious treat.

Vitamin A is crucial for the health and well-being of your skin. Sweet potatoes are a great source of Vitamin A. The skin is often forgotten as a part of the body’s immune system. It is literally your body’s first line of defense against the outside world. Other orange foods like carrots, pumpkin and cantaloupe are also high in this beneficial vitamin.

Vitamin D also contributes to a stronger immune system. Getting sufficient amounts of vitamin D is especially important for diabetics. It stimulates the pancreas and encourages insulin production, thereby helping to keep blood sugar under better control.

Vitamin D can be found in greens like spinach, and in the bright yellow of egg yolks. Believe it or not, salmon and shrimp are also quite high in vitamin D, (along with containing heart healthy Omega 3 fats.)

The bright green, creamy flesh of the avocado make it a nutritional powerhouse and perhaps the most super of the super foods. The avocado is near perfection – plenty of healthy fat, but fiber as well. Fiber is another essential nutrient in maximizing immune function.

Fiber serves many purposes for the body. It helps to regulate blood sugar and prevents the absorption of cholesterol. Fiber is also responsible for promoting gut health and regularity. All of these benefits are especially helpful for individuals with diabetes. Without fiber our digestive tract suffers, therefore, immunity is compromised. Fiber also lowers blood sugar naturally by slowing the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream.

Avoiding the consumption of sugar is also crucial to improving immunity. Research has found that sugar can negatively affect the body’s immune system. It specifically hinders the ability to fight off bacterial infections. Yet one more way sugar is making us sick… literally! One important thing to note is that as a diabetic, high blood sugar is already compromising your immune system.

Keeping blood sugar under control is a huge way to improve immune strength. Think about it – if your body is less occupied by trying to keep your blood sugar at safe levels, it has more resources available to fight other things. By managing diabetes, you also reduce your risk for heart disease, stroke, and Alzheimer’s disease. Managing blood sugar now is a long-term investment in health for years to come.

By including plenty of colorful vegetables and fruits in our diets, we can not only improve immunity, but lower blood sugar and improve overall health. Be it avocado or sweet potato, bell pepper or spinach, including immune boosting foods in our diets is a great way to feel better and live healthier!

 

 

Source:

https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/05/health/immune-system-diet-food-as-fuel-explainer/index

 

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Kick Your Carbohydrate Habit – Here’s How https://diabetickitchen.com/kick-your-carbohydrate-habit/ https://diabetickitchen.com/kick-your-carbohydrate-habit/#comments Tue, 21 May 2019 21:39:26 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4228

Ah, carbohydrates. We hate to love them! Especially for those of us who struggle with high blood sugar. Why are carbs so craveable? What makes us want them so badly, and why do we have so much trouble giving them up? Believe it or not, the brain has more to do with this than the ...

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Ah, carbohydrates. We hate to love them! Especially for those of us who struggle with high blood sugar. Why are carbs so craveable? What makes us want them so badly, and why do we have so much trouble giving them up? Believe it or not, the brain has more to do with this than the stomach.

Simple/refined carbohydrates prompt rapid spikes and drops in blood sugar. Whether you consume a food that contains refined sugar, or a food that is a simple carbohydrate, the body receives both in the same way. Cookies, cakes, pasta, bread, etc. – the body sees them as equals and responds accordingly.

The pancreas releases insulin in order to move the sugar from the bloodstream into the cells where it can be used for energy. If there is not a sufficient amount of insulin available, or if the body’s cells are resistant to insulin, the excess sugar remains in the bloodstream. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) occurs when the level of glucose in the blood rises above the normal range.

The incoming calories from the food item consumed are then driven into muscle, liver, and fat cells. This reduces the amount of calories in the bloodstream available to the body for use as fuel. When your brain registers “low-fuel” it prompts feelings of hunger, causing you to want to eat again after only a short period of time. And so the cycle repeats, potentially causing weight gain and blood sugar control issues.

While certainly undesirable in the short term, weight gain and unstable blood sugar can lead to deadly long term effects on your health. Metabolic Syndrome is a health condition that encompasses high triglyceride levels, insulin resistance, obesity, and low HDL ‘good’ cholesterol levels. This syndrome increases one’s risk for heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and death.

Simply put, in order to control diabetes, you must eliminate sugar and refined carbs from your diet. There is hope, however! There are other carbohydrates (known as complex carbs) that have less of an impact on blood sugar. Complex carbs convert into sugar more slowly, giving the body a better chance to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood.

The key is to avoid simple/refined carbohydrates and consume complex carbohydrates instead. For example, instead of white rice try quinoa. Quinoa is a great source of both protein and fiber. One cup of quinoa contains 8 grams of protein and 5 grams of fiber. This combination not only fills you up, it helps stabilize your blood sugar, too.

Swap that bowl of sugary breakfast cereal for a bowl of our Cinnamon Pecan Granola Cereal with fresh berries. Steel-cut oats are another complex carb. As the oats digest, they release energy slowly, allowing you to hold onto your feeling of fullness. It also helps to keeps blood sugar and insulin levels stable.

Try a handful of nuts for your next snack instead of potato chips. Raw, unsalted nuts like almonds and walnuts are full of protein, healthy fats, and nutrients. This makes nuts a great addition to meals and desserts, and also qualifies them as an exceptional snack. A handful of nuts will help you stay full and energized far longer than a bag of potato chips would!

Eat whole fresh fruit, like apples. The fiber in the fruit and skin of an apple helps you feel full and satisfied, and slows the absorption of the apple’s natural sugars into the bloodstream.

Sweet potatoes are a complex carb that is high in many nutrients: beta-carotene, vitamins A, B6, C and E, thiamine, niacin, and potassium. They also contain protein and calcium!

The best way to enjoy complex carbs is in combination with foods that will help to slow their absorption even more. If the complex carbohydrate is paired with fiber, protein, or fat, it is absorbed even more slowly and blood sugar will remain more stable. Fiber and healthy fats are absolutely essential for blood sugar management.

Isn’t that a relief – you don’t have to give up all carbs for the rest of your life just because you’re a diabetic! By consuming the right carbs in appropriate portions, and in combination with other nutritious foods, stable blood sugar is achievable!

 

 

Source:

https://www.cnn.com/2017/10/17/health/carbohydrates-cravings-food-drayer/index.html

 

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What’s New In Diabetes Management? Focus On The Individual! https://diabetickitchen.com/new-diabetes-management-focus-on-the-individual/ https://diabetickitchen.com/new-diabetes-management-focus-on-the-individual/#respond Wed, 17 Apr 2019 21:34:02 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4291

Finally! Healthcare providers are shifting the focus of care to the needs of patients as individuals. This is a monumental change from the mindset of “Every patient with ABC is treated with the XYZ plan of care.” Instead of automatically assigning you the same diet, medication and exercise plan as every other diabetic patient, emphasis ...

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Finally! Healthcare providers are shifting the focus of care to the needs of patients as individuals. This is a monumental change from the mindset of “Every patient with ABC is treated with the XYZ plan of care.”

Instead of automatically assigning you the same diet, medication and exercise plan as every other diabetic patient, emphasis is placed on what works for you as the individual. In recent years, patients have not been allowed, let alone encouraged to be directly involved in developing their own plans of care. Times are changing, and diabetics have to take advantage.

Educate & Empower Yourself

When it comes to managing diabetes, knowledge is power. The more information you have, the better decisions you can make. Work with your healthcare team to develop a realistic plan of care for your high blood sugar. If your physician prescribes medication, take it as directed. While lifestyle changes are the key to reversing diabetes and achieving your best health long-term, prescription medications can help bring blood sugar to a level that is actually manageable.

Food

Food is life… literally! This may be the most difficult shift in lifestyle when working with your healthcare team. Food is personal, even emotional for many people. Food cultures and traditions are deeply ingrained in us, and can be incredibly impactful to our happiness.

Even if a certain food makes us happy, some things that just aren’t good for the body. Any other French fry lovers out there? However, that doesn’t mean that a healthful diet can’t be delicious and satisfying. How about a little change in perspective?

Start by taking a closer look at the opinions and feelings you attach to certain foods. For example, do you think of a doughnut as an evil enemy sent to tempt and destroy you? Do you picture good health when you see an apple?

Resist labeling foods as good or bad. This gives food too much power and influence over your thoughts.  It is true that some foods are better for your body (and blood sugar) than others, but no single food determines your overall health or well-being. When you cook and eat real, quality foods it becomes obvious that nutritious can be delicious. Avocados, berries, even olive oil and garlic are just a few foods that pack a powerful punch!

Avocados have a positive impact on insulin levels. Monounsaturated fats help boost insulin function, and aid in keeping blood sugar lower and more stable. An avocado is a great source of fiber, which helps to regulate blood sugar, as well.

Loaded with fiber and antioxidants, raspberries and blackberries top the list with more than 7 grams of fiber per cup. Blueberries are also a great source of vitamins and soluble fiber. Studies have found that glucose levels reduce over time when blueberries are included in one’s diet.

The world has been enjoying the health benefits of olives and olive oil for thousands of years. Those benefits are due to healthy fats, phytonutrients, as well as, a variety of vitamins and antioxidants. A team of Virginia Tech researchers discovered that the compound oleuropein found in olives encourages the body to secrete more insulin, helping to reduce blood sugar and better control diabetes!

Garlic has been revered as a contributor to better health for centuries. Research is starting to suggest that it may even show promise for lowering blood sugar. A 2005 study which administered garlic orally to diabetic rats recorded significant decreases in blood glucose. Researchers also found that garlic can lower total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and increase insulin production.

Work with your healthcare team to develop a meal plan to include the right combination of healthy fats, fiber, and protein. Talk about the foods you love and the foods you don’t. Find countless recipes online and find creative ways to adapt them to your taste. Bottom line: if you don’t like it, you won’t eat it. Figure out what tastes best to you!

Exercise

Regular physical activity contributes nearly countless positive effects on your health, especially for those with diabetes. It helps your body make the best use of insulin and glucose, which controls blood sugar more effectively. In fact, exercise can reduce blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours after working out.

Regular physical activity also lowers blood pressure, improves circulation, and helps control cholesterol levels, thereby reducing risk of heart attack and stroke. Exercise also helps to strengthen muscles and bones, along with burning extra body fat. It’s a great way to boost energy levels and reduce stress, too!

While many Americans fall short of the recommended 150 minutes of physical activity per week, research has shown that even a short walk each day can make a major difference in your health.

Talk with your physician about which exercise methods are right for you. Bad knee? Low impact exercises are the way to go. Absolutely love going for a swim? That’s a great way to get active! Just like with food, figure out what works best for you.

Sleep

The body’s reaction to lack of sleep can mimic insulin resistance. Insulin resistance occurs due to the cell’s inability to utilize insulin. This results in high blood sugar. Quality sleep is essential to a happy and healthy life for everyone, and especially for diabetics.

One way to help improve your night’s sleep is to form a bedtime routine. Perhaps you enjoy a warm bath each night before bed; add some lavender or chamomile bath oil to relax your muscles and your mind. You may prefer to sleep with a fan in your room for noise and air circulation. Avoid looking at brightly lit screens (television, cell phone) before bed as these devices stimulate your brain and keep you awake.

Some people need more sleep than others. Track your sleep and talk with your physician about what you find. Does 6 hours of sleep leave you feeling refreshed or more like a zombie? Do you need 9 hours just to feel more human than bear? Don’t skip this step – sleep is key!

Stress

Feeling stressed or anxious? Studies have shown that coming home after a long day and preparing a meal can significantly lower stress and anxiety!

How you ask? Your mind becomes occupied with the task at hand – finding a recipe, collecting all of your ingredients from the fridge and pantry, compiling them one by one to create something delicious, then getting to sit down and enjoy your hard work. That “present” mindset can be very helpful in reducing anxiety, and cooking meals at home is a great way to get started.

Research has also found that just a few minutes of meditation every day alters the pathways in your brain, making you more resilient to stress. This helps to improve not only your mental sense of well-being, but your physical one, as well. Give it a try! Meditation, prayer, or yoga are all great options for decreasing stress and increasing energy.

Don’t be afraid to talk with your healthcare team about how you’re feeling. This endeavor to improve health and blood sugar is a big deal that comes with big emotions. There is absolutely no shame in speaking with your doctor about your stress levels, inability to sleep, frustrations with diet, lack of support from family and friends, etc. The mind and the body are truly connected. One cannot exist or thrive without the health of the other.

In conclusion, it’s time diabetics take advantage of healthcare’s shift in focus. Get involved in your care – ask questions. Be your own advocate in your journey to better health. That journey is comprised of many steps. Some of those steps may be larger, or more uncomfortable than others. However, the destination of lower blood sugar and better health is worth every single step!

 

 

Source:

https://www.endocrineweb.com/news/diabetes/60788-whats-new-diabetes-care-individualizing-care-takes-priority

 

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Mindful Eating For Better Blood Sugar https://diabetickitchen.com/mindful-eating-better-blood-sugar/ https://diabetickitchen.com/mindful-eating-better-blood-sugar/#respond Sun, 31 Mar 2019 20:55:17 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4320

Mindful eating… what does that mean? Being aware of what we are eating, how much we are eating, and when we are full. Another large part of being mindful with eating is acknowledging how food can impact how we feel. Start by taking a closer look at the opinions and feelings you attach to certain ...

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Mindful eating… what does that mean? Being aware of what we are eating, how much we are eating, and when we are full. Another large part of being mindful with eating is acknowledging how food can impact how we feel.

Start by taking a closer look at the opinions and feelings you attach to certain foods. For example, do you think of a doughnut as an evil enemy sent to tempt and destroy you? Do you picture good health when you see an apple?

Resist labeling foods as good or bad. This gives food too much power and influence over your thoughts.  It is true that some foods are better for your body (and blood sugar) than others, but no single food determines your overall health or well-being.

Don’t tell yourself you must make healthy choices only from this point on. Saying you will never eat a certain food for the rest of your life is unrealistic. Doing so will only make you crave that specific food more.

Food cravings originate in the parts of the brain that manage feelings of pleasure and reward. There are a few different potential causes for a food craving to be triggered. The first is an imbalance of hormones, like serotonin or leptin, which can cause a craving. The absence of essential nutrients can also prompt the brain to crave certain foods.

The endorphins that are released into the body after you’ve eaten can also trigger a craving. Food doesn’t just impact and satisfy us physically, but emotionally as well. Cravings can then become driven by emotion, especially if you are eating for comfort.

Emotions and food are closely tied, yet we rarely connect how we feel with what/when we eat. Certain foods make you happy… literally! In the same turn, stressful situations can trigger the desire to eat.

“Going on a diet” can really max out stress levels. Dieting triggers an increase in stress hormones like cortisol, which has been linked to weight gain. This is part of why it is so hard to lose weight, and keep it off.  Traditional “dieting” is actually far more likely to cause weight gain than weight loss.

When stressed, bored, or anxious, we are more likely to fall victim to emotional eating. It can be a truly vicious cycle! The key to living your best health is not through “dieting” but through a commitment to a healthier lifestyle.

To help develop a more positive relationship with food, start by cooking more meals at home. If you are a drive-thru devotee, it likely seems a little daunting to plan and prepare meals at home, but it really is quite simple!

Try assigning one type of recipe for each night of the week to get you started. For example, Meatless Mondays (Veggie Stir-fry one week and Vegetable Lasagna the next) and Taco Tuesdays (beef tacos one week and chicken or shrimp the next.) Relish the opportunity to be creative. Relish… get it? It’s a food pun!

Speaking of creativity, take some of your favorite recipes and turn them healthy. We are far more likely to choose foods we like; we want food to taste good! Trust us, healthy and delicious are not mutually exclusive.

For example, cauliflower is a diamond in the rough when it comes to hacking your favorite indulgent foods. Forget about the pasty, bland cauliflower you may have known; open your eyes (and your mouth) to its potential.

What would you give to enjoy some fried rice, pizza, or macaroni and cheese right now? Try this recipe for Cauliflower Fried Rice. For “pizza crust” use your food processor to get the cauliflower very fine, then mix with cheese, eggs and spices. Top with your favorite sauce, meats and veggies, for a pizza that is high in fiber, low in carbs, and out of this world! Not to mention the cauliflower in this recipe for Almost Mac-N-Cheese that is sure to be a family favorite!

Now don’t go eating three bowls of Almost Mac-N-Cheese… (trust us, you’ll want to.) Portion control is another crucial part of mindful eating. Science has confirmed that when humans are presented with more food, we consume more food.

This phenomenon has been dubbed by some as the ‘portion size effect.’ Believe it or not, when portion sizes are doubled, individuals consume an average of 35% more food! Pre-portioning can help you avoid the trap of overeating.

Picture this – you’re on the couch watching television eating popcorn. It’s true that popcorn is a tasty, low-glycemic snack for diabetics. That doesn’t mean you can eat the entire bag. By portioning the popcorn into a smaller bag or bowl, you can watch and snack without fear of overeating.

Speaking of television, removing distractions while eating is another way to trick yourself into more mindful eating. By sitting down and really focusing on your actual meal, you can truly enjoy it. You’ll also feel full faster because you are taking the time to chew each bite. This allows you to feel when you’ve had enough. Ta-dah! Mindful eating at its best.

While it may sound complicated, mindful eating is all about acknowledging the true enjoyment of food. It’s an experience, it fuels us body and soul. Food should make us feel happy, not guilty. By implementing mindful eating strategies, that happiness is not only possible, but inevitable!

 

 

Sources:

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/can-mindfulness-help-with-weightloss

 

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Which Fats Are Good & Which Should Be Avoided https://diabetickitchen.com/which-fats-are-good-which-to-avoid/ https://diabetickitchen.com/which-fats-are-good-which-to-avoid/#comments Sun, 03 Mar 2019 17:41:03 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4286

Listen up people – it’s okay to eat fats! Not only should eating healthy fats be accepted, it should be encouraged. But wait… aren’t fatty foods unhealthy because they cause heart disease? No! Decades ago, the sugar industry paid off Harvard scientists to lie about what roles sugar and fat play in your diet. Their goal ...

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Listen up people – it’s okay to eat fats! Not only should eating healthy fats be accepted, it should be encouraged. But wait… aren’t fatty foods unhealthy because they cause heart disease? No!

Decades ago, the sugar industry paid off Harvard scientists to lie about what roles sugar and fat play in your diet. Their goal was to reduce or eliminate the role that sugar plays in heart disease.

They had to have a bad guy, so they suggested that fat played a bigger role than it actually does. Their review appeared in the highly trusted New England Journal of Medicine in 1967, prompting the misconception that fat is bad for health, when sugar is the true villain.

This false claim has caused the American diet to take a nose dive. The low-fat, high-sugar food craze has dominated recent decades and devastated the health of our nation. There is hope, however – the realization that we need to eat fat!

Fat is absolutely essential to good health. Did you know that every single cell in the human body contains fat? Even the brain requires fat in order to function.

If we do not consume enough fat, cognitive function declines, mood plummets, and it doesn’t end there. Hormones will fall out of balance, digestive health suffers, the immune system is compromised, even our ability to handle the stressors of everyday life is reduced… all because our bodies are not getting the fat they need!

In fact, research has found that you are three times more likely to die from an insufficient intake of healthy fats (low-fat/high-carb diet) than you are from excess intake of saturated fats. Definitive proof that healthy fats heal the body, not hurt it.

Eating a diet rich in good fats lowers risk for heart disease, obesity, and Type II diabetes complications. Healthy fats and fiber are key players in the game of health; especially when it comes to diabetes. Healthy fats help us feel satisfied, while fiber keeps us full and helps metabolize glucose. A successful recipe for blood sugar management.

It is crucial to choose the right healthy fats in order to reap these benefits. According to several studies, it is not the amount of fat you eat that affects health, it is the type of fat. There are several different types of fats, each found in a variety of foods. Believe it or not, there are a ton of heart-healthy foods out there!

Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids are two good fats. These fats lower cholesterol and blood pressure levels, therefore, reducing risk of heart disease. Monounsaturated fats can be found in a variety of nuts, as well as, avocados, and olive oil.

Avocado has been in the spotlight lately as a trendy brunch food. Talk about the epitome of delicious and nutritious! Avocados are an excellent source of healthy fats and are also high in fiber. Research has proved time and again the health benefits of eating avocados. Those include reduced risk of hypertension, stroke, diabetes complications and obesity just to name a few.

Polyunsaturated fats, also known as omega-3 fatty acids, can be found in walnuts, and in fish like salmon and mackerel. These omega fats improve cholesterol levels, decrease risk of heart failure and stroke, along with lowering blood pressure. A handful of nuts make a quick, easy, delicious heart-healthy snack on the go!

Don’t shy away from butter, full-fat dairy, or bacon because they fall into the saturated fats category. While villainized in recent years due to the low-fat lies, these foods are sources of fat that should be included in our diets, too! Butter added to Bulletproof coffee in the morning, full-fat Greek yogurt with fresh berries as a snack, or a bacon and blue cheese salad for dinner. Yum!

There is one type of fat to avoid – trans fats. Trans fats have no positive nutritional impact; instead they are highly dangerous to consume. They increase bad cholesterol and decrease good cholesterol. This skyrockets the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and type II diabetes.

Manufacturers add trans fats in order to prolong the shelf life of many processed and packaged foods. They are also frequently used by fast food chains for deep frying. Trans fats are seriously bad news.

The moral of the story is that healthy fats make for a healthier you! Improved blood sugar, heart and brain health, and reduced risk for heart attack, stroke, even obesity. Fats are the key to living your healthiest life!

 

Sources:

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/what-is-good-fat

https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/fats/trans-fat

 

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Artificial Sweeteners Do Not Contribute To Weight Loss https://diabetickitchen.com/artificial-sweeteners-do-not-contribute-to-weight-loss/ https://diabetickitchen.com/artificial-sweeteners-do-not-contribute-to-weight-loss/#respond Sun, 24 Feb 2019 20:47:40 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4372

The diet industry hauls in billions of dollars in profits each year. In the quest for perfection, many of us turn to calorie-counting in order to lose weight. This has made zero-calorie sweeteners explode in popularity. Nearly half of American adults consume artificial sweeteners on a daily basis. Not because of their taste, but for ...

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The diet industry hauls in billions of dollars in profits each year. In the quest for perfection, many of us turn to calorie-counting in order to lose weight. This has made zero-calorie sweeteners explode in popularity.

Nearly half of American adults consume artificial sweeteners on a daily basis. Not because of their taste, but for their lack of calories. However, research is now showing that not only do artificial sweeteners prevent weight loss, they can actually encourage weight gain!

Researchers at the University of Manitoba found that artificial, zero-calorie sweeteners had no consistent link to decreased body weight. Neither were there reductions in body mass index (BMI) or waist size. Instead, artificial sweeteners were linked to increased risk of weight gain. Yikes!

What causes the weight gain? Artificial sweeteners prompt ‘reward’ signals in the brain. Just like with real sugar, the brain can become dependent and crave more. This can lead to increased consumption of higher calorie foods, causing weight gain.

Our taste buds can be deadened by artificial sweeteners. They affect our sense of what tastes ‘sweet’ and what does not. We can then be more likely to consume foods that contain sugar, making it nearly impossible to manage diabetes.

Thirdly, individuals think that with a zero-calorie sweetener, they have calories to spare. This can encourage indulgence in foods (and portion sizes.) Quite frankly, packing on pounds has never sounded easier.

If you think you’re in the clear because you drink your coffee black without sweetener… think again. Do you drink diet soda?

Many diabetics turn to ‘diet’ sodas because they do not contain ‘sugar.’ However, research found no difference in diabetes risk between those who consumed the ‘diet’ drink and those who consumed a beverage sweetened with actual sugar.

Let’s state that again. There was no reduction in diabetes risk between individuals who consume sugar-sweetened drinks and those who consume artificially sweetened drinks. Instead, researchers found that those who drink artificially-sweetened beverages have double the risk of developing metabolic syndrome.

Metabolic syndrome is an extremely dangerous condition consisting of high blood sugar, elevated blood pressure, unstable cholesterol levels, and excess body fat around the waist. Metabolic syndrome greatly increases one’s risk of heart attack, cardiovascular disease, and stroke.

Just one diet beverage per day triggered high blood pressure in women, and increased their risk for heart disease (the number one cause of death for women in the U.S.) Risk of heart attack was equal among those who drank traditional sugar sweetened beverages and those who drank artificially sweetened ones.

So with all of this research, how have artificial sweeteners remained so popular?  People still think they are making a ‘healthier choice.’ The happy, cheerfully colorful commercials certainly aren’t helping.

The manufacturers couldn’t be happier. They’ve spent millions in marketing their products as healthy alternatives to sugar. Their wallets are padded, while our risk for deadly heathy issues skyrockets. So, what’s the answer?

There are safe choices; natural zero-calorie sweeteners like stevia and monk fruit. The biggest key to long-term weight loss is simple – eat real food. Clean, quality foods make the true difference. One that artificial or ‘diet’ foods never could.

 

Sources:

https://www.livescience.com/64411-sugar-substitutes-health-benefits.html

 

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