probiotics – Diabetic Kitchen https://diabetickitchen.com Wed, 16 Oct 2019 17:10:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Probiotics, Prebiotics… What’s the Difference? https://diabetickitchen.com/probiotics-prebiotics-whats-the-difference/ https://diabetickitchen.com/probiotics-prebiotics-whats-the-difference/#respond Wed, 16 Oct 2019 15:53:36 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=4579

The home of an estimated 100 trillion organisms, the gut is the “second brain” of the body. Simply put, a healthy digestive system is essential. As a result, it’s important to balance our gut bacteria in order for our bodies to function best. When it comes to the gut, the battle is always on between ...

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The home of an estimated 100 trillion organisms, the gut is the “second brain” of the body. Simply put, a healthy digestive system is essential. As a result, it’s important to balance our gut bacteria in order for our bodies to function best. When it comes to the gut, the battle is always on between good and bad bacteria.

Diet is a huge factor in the balance of bacteria in the gut. Consuming a diet low in quality nutrition or maintaining an unhealthy lifestyle put the body at risk of developing too much bad bacteria. These bacteria could lead to digestive upset, stomach problems, even the development of certain diseases.

Never fear, there are healthy bacteria to combat the harmful! Probiotics are a huge player in the healthy gut game. These good bacteria are to thank for the gut functioning as it should. They are responsible for the effective transformation of food into fuel for the body. In addition, they also help to protect immune health.

There’s been a lot of talk about probiotics in recent years, and for good reason. Along with increasing the number of good bacteria in the gut, probiotics help to destroy bad bacteria and viruses that could cause disease. Moreover, probiotics are vitamin-producers. Plus, they are great at facilitating more effective digestion of the foods we eat.

While probiotics can be consumed in the form of supplements, they are also found in many fermented foods. For instance, sauerkraut and kimchi. Likewise, yogurt and kefir. All fermented foods, all rich in probiotics.

Probiotics are awesome indeed. Now, have you heard of prebiotics?

The two are similar in name and helpful purpose, but they are different in function. Prebiotics help to eliminate bad bacteria, while feeding the good bacteria (probiotics) already present in the gut.

The prebiotics we consume pass through the stomach and small intestine to reach the large intestine where they begin to ferment. Now, while bacteria fermenting in your gut may sound gross, this is actually where prebiotics begin their helpful work. The fermented prebiotics serve as food for the probiotics in the gut. Therefore, those good bacteria start to flourish.

The gut becomes balanced and nutrients are absorbed more efficiently. In addition, the immune system is boosted and fat is more easily metabolized. Hooray for prebiotics! Like probiotics, prebiotics can be found in a variety of foods. Asparagus, radishes, apples, tomatoes, and onions are all sources of prebiotics.

What if you could help your gut by eating granola cereal? How about donuts, brownies and cheesy bread? That’s right! All Diabetic Kitchen products contain prebiotics, essential for the growth of healthy probiotic gut bacteria. All of these delicious foods can help you achieve better gut health (and lower blood sugar.)

Above all, a healthy gut is of particular importance to diabetics. Believe it or not, a healthier gut leads to lower blood sugar. It’s true!

The multiplication of good bacteria in the digestive system causes the gut environment to become more acidic. As a result, the body naturally releases more insulin. This process is one way in which researchers have connected a healthy gut to lower blood sugar!

Plain and simple, a balanced gut is crucial to a healthy body. Probiotics and prebiotics are key. Research proves that the foods we eat directly affect our gut, thereby having a powerful impact on the entire body. You know what they say… you are what you eat!

 

Stephanie Johnson has a master’s degree from the University of Central Florida and is a Certified Nutrition & Wellness Consultant.

 

Sources:

https://www.bulletproof.com/gut-healthprebiotics

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/probiotics-101#what-they-are

https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/drugs/14598-probiotics

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The Mediterranean Diet Improves Gut Health https://diabetickitchen.com/mediterranean-diet-improves-gut-health/ https://diabetickitchen.com/mediterranean-diet-improves-gut-health/#respond Tue, 03 Jul 2018 17:24:57 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=3854

You’ve probably heard of the Mediterranean Diet, and the incredible impact it can have on health. It started when scientists wanted to find out why death from cardiovascular diseases (the number one cause of death in the U.S.) is significantly lower in countries around the Mediterranean Sea. Their research findings credit the Mediterranean Diet due ...

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You’ve probably heard of the Mediterranean Diet, and the incredible impact it can have on health. It started when scientists wanted to find out why death from cardiovascular diseases (the number one cause of death in the U.S.) is significantly lower in countries around the Mediterranean Sea. Their research findings credit the Mediterranean Diet due to its many benefits: reduced inflammation, improved “good” cholesterol and lowered “bad” cholesterol, prevention of blood clots, decreased blood pressure, and improved blood vessel function. In one major study, the Mediterranean Diet reduced occurrence of heart attacks, strokes and death by 30%!

Continuing research into the benefits of the Mediterranean Diet has now found that it also improves gut health. Researchers found greater diversity of gut bacteria in study participants who consumed a Mediterranean diet than in the participant group who followed a traditional Western diet. The “good bacteria” like Lactobacillus, a probiotic, were found to be significantly increased in the Mediterranean Diet group.

While it may not seem like a big deal, this is great news, especially for diabetics. Probiotics help move food through the digestive system. When your gut is working at peak performance, you can expect not only improved digestion, but better odds of fighting off food-borne illness, even helping to heal diseases like IBS and Crohn’s.

Not only will your digestive function benefit, but you will also experience a boost in immunity. An astounding 80% of the body’s immune system is located in the gut! Probiotics can help you fend off all sorts of illnesses, from the common cold to the flu.

Blood sugar will also be lower when the gut is at its healthiest. There is a naturally-occurring compound in the gut called butyrate. Butyrate may positively impact insulin sensitivity. When insulin sensitivity is improved, the body does a better job of regulating blood sugar and is able to keep blood sugar levels lower.

The digestive system is also a huge part of the body’s neurological system. Chronic fatigue, joint pain, thyroid disease, even psoriasis are initiated in the gut. With improved gut health, some symptoms of these illnesses could be alleviated.

Speaking of the neurological system, the reduced levels of insulin in a diabetic’s brain can directly stimulate cognitive decline and the potential development of Alzheimer’s (the most common form of dementia, affecting nearly 5.5 million people in the U.S. alone.)

A diabetic’s insulin resistance prevents effective flow of glucose for brain cells to use as fuel. Damage to blood vessels in the brain, along with the inflammation caused by high blood sugar, can also encourage the development of Alzheimer’s. New research has found that individuals who followed a Mediterranean-inspired diet lowered their risk of Alzheimer’s dementia by one third – just another win for the Mediterranean Diet!

So what does this magical Mediterranean Diet look (and taste) like? Let’s start with the positives – here are the foods that make the diet so amazing:

Plenty of fresh veggies like cucumbers, broccoli, tomatoes, spinach, kale, and cauliflower.

Fresh fruits like apples, berries, pears, grapes, bananas, and citrus. (Diabetics, choose lower glycemic fruits like fresh berries and apples over high glycemic ones like citrus or bananas.)

A handful of nuts like almonds, cashews, and walnuts make for a quick and tasty snack on the Mediterranean Diet. Seeds like pumpkin and sunflower are also great for snacking, or as added crunch to salads.

Lentils are fantastic for reducing blood sugar, and are an excellent way to add some non-meat protein into your diet. Along with lentils, beans and peas are also great addition to Mediterranean dishes.

Speaking of protein, the Mediterranean Diet is focused around seafood – salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, shrimp, crab, clams, and mussels. Poultry like chicken and duck (and their eggs) are also allowed on the Mediterranean Diet, but lean red meat should be consumed only occasionally.

Whole grains like oats, brown rice, quinoa, and whole grain breads and pastas are present in the Mediterranean Diet, but diabetics must choose with caution in order to avoid blood sugar spikes.

Dairy like cheese and Greek yogurt are also included in the Mediterranean Diet; always be sure to choose full-fat dairy products in order to avoid added sugars.

Olives, extra virgin olive oil, avocados and avocado oil build the foundation of the Mediterranean Diet. The combination of the monounsaturated fatty oleic acid and protective phytonutrients in olives combine to provide serious anti-inflammatory power, helping to combat chronic health conditions like cancer, heart disease, and osteoporosis. Avocados are a good source of antioxidant carotenoids like beta-carotene, which also help to prevent free radical damage and chronic illness.

Now for the foods to avoid when following the Mediterranean Diet:

This first portion should sound familiar to the diabetics in the audience – no sugar! That means cutting out candy, soda, ice cream, cakes, cookies… anything that contains sugar is a no go in the Mediterranean Diet. (This includes simple carbohydrates like white breads and pastas, chips, crackers, etc. which the body processes in the same way as sugar.) If you’ve been working on keeping your blood sugar low for any period of time, this should not be a huge change to your current diet.

If you are a fan of Diabetic Kitchen, the second half of this list is likely familiar, as well. Cut out the processed foods! Most everything that comes in a plastic container or sits on the shelf in a box – from margarine to canola oil to hot dogs… toss it out. The Mediterranean Diet focuses on fresh, whole nutrition in order to heal and protect the body.

Sounds pretty straightforward right? With a focus on vegetables, healthy fats, and lean protein, eating in the style of the Mediterranean Diet is an excellent option for diabetics. Better blood sugar control, heart health, and now improved gut health… it’s time to take your diet to the Mediterranean!

 

 

Sources:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180425120149.htm

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/mediterranean-diet-meal-plan#section4

 

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Heal Your Gut (And Your Body) With These Tips! https://diabetickitchen.com/heal-your-gut-with-these-tips/ https://diabetickitchen.com/heal-your-gut-with-these-tips/#comments Wed, 06 Sep 2017 16:43:01 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=3235

New research has shown that the foods we eat directly affect the bacteria in our gut, thereby having a powerful impact on the health of the entire body. When your gut works better, your body works better. The home of an estimated 100 trillion organisms, your gut is the “second brain” of your body. The ...

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New research has shown that the foods we eat directly affect the bacteria in our gut, thereby having a powerful impact on the health of the entire body. When your gut works better, your body works better.

The home of an estimated 100 trillion organisms, your gut is the “second brain” of your body. The gut does everything from transforming food into fuel for the body, to protecting your immune health, to lowering blood sugar.

The digestive system is a huge part of the body’s neurological system. Chronic fatigue, joint pain, thyroid disease, even psoriasis are all initiated in the gut. With improved gut health, some symptoms of these illnesses could be alleviated.

We are learning more about our gut bacteria than ever – now we know it can change significantly from day to day, even hour to hour based upon the foods we eat.

Fiber and probiotic-rich foods are key to creating the best gut microbe environment for good health. Foods that do not contain fiber or probiotics slow down digestion, and compromise gut health.

Probiotics are live bacteria that stimulate the growth of helpful microorganisms, especially those in your gut. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are the two most common probiotics.

Lactobacillus is best known for helping ease diarrhea and assisting in the processing of lactose (the sugar found in milk.)  Bifidobacterium may help ease symptoms of various digestive issues, including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS.)

Along with kimchi and sauerkraut, some of the most popular fermented foods are yogurt, kombucha (a fermented sweet tea), kefir (a fermented milk beverage), and tempeh (fermented soybeans.)

All of these, and other fermented foods, contain healthy probiotic bacteria. Yogurt has been shown to reduce risk for heart disease, and kimchi to reduce risk of diabetes complications and obesity.

When you include fermented foods in your diet, they work with your body to help optimize the digestion and absorption of nutrients. Research has also shown that fermenting foods can make them more nutritious. For example, some foods developed Vitamin B nutrients that they did not contain before they were fermented.

Fiber is also key to gut health! Fiber serves many purposes for the body. It helps to regulate blood sugar, it prevents the absorption of cholesterol, and promotes gut health and regularity.

All of these benefits are especially helpful for diabetics as it is crucial to control blood sugar, as well as, heart health. Without fiber, our digestive tract suffers, we develop high cholesterol that may lead to heart disease, and inflammation may increase in the body.

The vast majority of Americans get less than half of the daily recommended 25 and 35 grams of fiber. It may sound like a lot, but there are many delicious ways to get your fiber on!

Low in calories, rich in fiber and essential nutrients, artichokes are a great addition to your diet. Just one medium artichoke accounts for nearly half of the recommend daily fiber intake for women, and a third for men.

One cup of steamed broccoli contains nearly 5 grams of fiber. Plus, this cruciferous green veggie is rich in folate, potassium, and vitamins C & K.

Almonds, walnuts, cashews, pistachios, oh my! Nuts are an easy, convenient way to quickly increase your fiber intake.

Loaded with fiber and antioxidants, raspberries and blackberries all contain more than 7 grams of fiber per cup. Blueberries are also a great source of vitamins and soluble fiber. Studies have found that glucose levels reduce over time when blueberries are included in one’s diet. Bonus!

A wide variety of grains contain fiber, but few pack as nutritious a punch as quinoa. Quinoa is easy to digest and gluten-free, while being high in other essential nutrients such as iron, vitamin B-6, potassium and magnesium.

Beans and lentils, avocado, air-popped popcorn, are a few more high-fiber foods. They also double as blood-sugar stabilizers!

Be mindful of the ways in which you can protect the good bacteria already in your gut. Be wary of using antibacterial soap, it will remove any good bacteria along with the bad.

Resist relying on antibiotics for every sneeze and sniffle. Antibiotics devastate the biome of your gut. The purpose of an antibiotic is to kill bacteria. This process is not discriminatory, and severely depletes your body’s store of good bacteria.

 

 

Sources: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_168008.html

 

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New Research Reveals Link Between Gut Bacteria And Obesity https://diabetickitchen.com/gut-bacteria-and-obesity/ https://diabetickitchen.com/gut-bacteria-and-obesity/#respond Tue, 18 Jul 2017 15:51:12 +0000 https://diabetickitchen.com/?p=3135

Science is now investigating whether gut health could also be a proponent of obesity. When gut bacteria break down food, chemicals are released into the body. Certain chemicals may prompt the production of fat cells, according to new research. In theory, if the gut was functioning well, with plenty of good bacteria present to digest ...

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Science is now investigating whether gut health could also be a proponent of obesity. When gut bacteria break down food, chemicals are released into the body. Certain chemicals may prompt the production of fat cells, according to new research.

In theory, if the gut was functioning well, with plenty of good bacteria present to digest food as completely and quickly as possible, the body may produce less fat cells. Research continues in order to pinpoint the connection, as well as, which foods may help or hinder fat cell production while in the gut.

Now, how can we help our guts work better?

Probiotics are live bacteria that stimulate the growth of helpful microorganisms, especially those in your gut. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are the two most common probiotics.

Lactobacillus can be found in yogurt and other fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi. It is best known for helping ease diarrhea and assisting in the processing of lactose (the sugar found in milk.)  Bifidobacterium can also be found in some dairy products, and may help ease symptoms of various digestive issues, including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS.)

When you consume probiotics, not only will your digestive function benefit, but you will also experience a boost in immunity. An astounding 80% of the body’s immune system is located in the gut! Probiotics can help you fend off all sorts of illnesses, from the common cold to the flu. [see Why Probiotics Are A Must For Type 2 Diabetics]

The digestive system is also a huge part of the body’s neurological system. Chronic fatigue, joint pain, thyroid disease, even psoriasis are all initiated in the gut. With improved gut health, some symptoms of these illnesses could be alleviated.

While probiotics due naturally occur in several foods, some find it helpful to take a probiotic supplement.

First, speak with your healthcare team. Probiotics are safe for most people, although individuals with immune disorders or other serious health conditions may need special consideration. You should always consult with your physician prior to starting new supplements or medications.

When first starting probiotic supplements, you may experience temporary bloating, upset stomach, gas, or diarrhea. These symptoms should resolve within a few days as your digestive system regulates.

Make sure the bottle label states “shelf stable” or “refrigeration not required.” If not, you will have to keep your probiotics in the refrigerator to prevent the bacteria from expiring. Also check the label for potential allergens like dairy, wheat, soy, and gluten.

Also be mindful of the ways in which you can protect the good bacteria already in your gut. Be wary of using antibacterial soap, it will remove any good bacteria along with the bad, and you don’t want to “throw the baby out with the bath water.”

Resist relying on antibiotics for every sneeze and sniffle. Antibiotics devastate the biome of your gut. The purpose of an antibiotic is to kill bacteria. This process is not discriminatory, and severely depletes your body’s store of good bacteria. Think about it – have antibiotics ever “upset your stomach?” Makes sense now doesn’t it?

Set your gut up for success! While eating fermented foods and taking a probiotic supplement will help, concentrate on eating as many healing foods as possible. Ditch the processed and refined foods, and cut sugar and excess starches from your diet. A diet of protein, healthy fats, and fiber makes the gut, and blood sugar, happy!

 

 

Sources: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170630124420.htm

 

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These Fermented Foods Improve Health and Blood Sugar https://diabetickitchen.com/fermented-foods-blood-sugar/ https://diabetickitchen.com/fermented-foods-blood-sugar/#comments Wed, 01 Mar 2017 21:14:07 +0000 http://diabetickitchen.com/?p=2693

Fermented foods – they are becoming more common in the U.S. as recipe ingredients, and as health foods. What does it mean to ferment a food? The process of fermentation occurs when sugars are converted into alcohol or organic acids by either bacteria or yeast. That’s right- the process that creates your favorite beer also ...

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Fermented foods – they are becoming more common in the U.S. as recipe ingredients, and as health foods.

What does it mean to ferment a food? The process of fermentation occurs when sugars are converted into alcohol or organic acids by either bacteria or yeast. That’s right- the process that creates your favorite beer also produces foods like kimchi, olives, even cheese!

Have you heard whispers of fermented foods being good for you? Well, the food world is definitely talking; fermented foods were one of Whole Foods Top 5 food trend predictions last year!

Kimchi is one of the most well-known fermented foods. Kimchi originated in Korea, where winters are cold and fertile farm land is not widely available. Koreans salted what vegetables they had in order to preserve them. This salting and preservation process caused the vegetables to ferment.

Sauerkraut is also a popular fermented food. Not just to enjoy on hot dogs, sauerkraut is a treasured ingredient in many cultures. Although thought of as a German creation, builders of the Great Wall of China enjoyed sauerkraut often and it likely spread to Europe through the plundering travels of Ghengis Khan.

Along with kimchi and sauerkraut, some of the most popular fermented foods are yogurt, kombucha (a fermented sweet tea), kefir (a fermented milk beverage), and tempeh (fermented soybeans.)

All of these, and other fermented foods, contain healthy probiotic bacteria. When you include fermented foods in your diet, they work with your body to help optimize the digestion and absorption of nutrients.

Research has also shown that fermenting foods can make them more nutritious. For example, some foods developed Vitamin B nutrients that they did not contain before they were fermented.

So exactly what do fermented foods do to benefit the body?

All the action happens in the gut. The home of an estimated 100 trillion organisms, your gut is the “second brain” of your body. The gut does everything from transforming food into fuel for the body, to protecting your immune health, to lowering blood sugar.

In your gut, there is a naturally-occurring compound called butyrate. Research has shown that butyrate may have a positive impact on insulin sensitivity. When insulin sensitivity is improved, the body does a better job of regulating blood sugar and is able to keep blood sugar levels lower.

When your gut works better, your body works better. Check out this information on the power of your gut and the benefits of probiotics for diabetics.

There are even more reasons to add fermented foods to your diet. Yogurt has been shown to reduce risk for heart disease, and kimchi to reduce risk of diabetes complications and obesity.

If you do choose to begin including fermented foods in your diet, start slowly. As the bacteria in your gut respond, you may experience gas, bloating, and changes in bowel habits. These symptoms should last no more than a couple of weeks as your gut adjusts to the new balance of bacteria.

So how many servings of fermented foods should we eat per day? If you experience an increase in the above symptoms or have stomach discomfort after enjoying a second serving of fermented foods, perhaps stick with one serving per day for a while until you acclimate. If two servings a day is working well for you, keep with it. Listen to your body, it will tell you what it needs.

You can find a wide variety of fermented foods in your local supermarket. Yogurt, kefir, and cheese are all fermented foods that can be found in the dairy section. Always be sure to choose full-fat yogurt, kefir, and cheese to reap the most benefit from dairy products. (The less fat a dairy product contains, the more sugar has been added for taste!)

In large chain stores, you will likely find kombucha and tempeh in the refrigerated section near the produce department. In this same section, also look for kimchi and sauerkraut.

The last two may only be available in cans, but strive to find them fresh. Canned or jarred foods have been processed with heat, which kills most (if not all) of the beneficial bacteria inside. Food labels should tell you which items contain “live organisms.” These are the winners!

You can also experiment by making your own fermented foods. Online resources are plentiful, and food tastes better when you make it yourself! Just check out these these 10 foods you can ferment at home.

While fermented foods may feel like a step outside of your comfort zone, you could reap some seriously delicious health benefits by giving them a try!

 

 

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/news/20170213/could-fermented-foods-boost-your-health#1

http://www.kitchenproject.com/history/sauerkraut.htm

zenkimchi.com/top-posts/kimchi-1-short-history/

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Can Probiotics Really Lower Blood Sugar? https://diabetickitchen.com/probiotics-lower-blood-sugar/ https://diabetickitchen.com/probiotics-lower-blood-sugar/#comments Fri, 02 Dec 2016 19:24:50 +0000 http://diabetickitchen.com/?p=2570

Probiotics are live bacteria that stimulate the growth of helpful microorganisms, especially those in your gut. While we may recognize bacteria as a bad thing that can cause disease, it also occurs naturally in the human body. There are the “bad” bacteria we immediately think of, but there are also “good” bacteria. Probiotics contain these ...

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Probiotics are live bacteria that stimulate the growth of helpful microorganisms, especially those in your gut.

While we may recognize bacteria as a bad thing that can cause disease, it also occurs naturally in the human body. There are the “bad” bacteria we immediately think of, but there are also “good” bacteria.

Probiotics contain these “good” bacteria. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are the two most common probiotics.

Lactobacillus can be found in yogurt and other fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi. It is best known for helping ease diarrhea and assisting in the processing of lactose (the sugar found in milk.)

Bifidobacterium can also be found in some dairy products, and may help ease symptoms of various digestive issues, including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS.)

Probiotics help move food through the digestive system. When your gut is working at peak performance, you can expect not only improved digestion, but better odds of fighting off food-borne illness, even helping to heal diseases like IBS and Crohn’s.

Not only will your digestive function benefit, but you will also experience a boost in immunity. An astounding 80% of the body’s immune system is located in the gut! Probiotics can help you fend off all sorts of illnesses, from the common cold to the flu.

The digestive system is also a huge part of the body’s neurological system. Chronic fatigue, joint pain, thyroid disease, even psoriasis are initiated in the gut. With improved gut health, some symptoms of these illnesses could be alleviated.

Are you beginning to see how important gut health really is? Well, thanks to the Cambridge Cardiac Care Centre in Ontario, Canada, there is now another potential benefit to taking probiotics.

New research suggests adding probiotics to your health regimen may help to lower blood sugar.

The 80 participants in the study were following the DASH diet, a diet recommended for individuals with high blood pressure. About 15% of the participants also had prediabetes.

All participants had their blood pressure, hemoglobin A1C levels, and fasting blood sugar levels checked prior to beginning the study.

Some of the participants followed the DASH diet only, while the others followed the DASH diet with the addition of probiotic-rich foods.

After three months, both groups experienced similar drops in blood pressure. Therefore, the addition of probiotics did not appear to affect that aspect of the study. However, the probiotics did affect participants’ blood sugar levels.

Participants who followed the DASH diet only lowered their A1C by 3.4% compared to an 8.9% reduction in A1C for those who had added probiotics.

The probiotics also affected participants’ fasting blood sugar. The DASH diet only group lowered fasting blood sugar by 3.3% while the DASH plus probiotic group enjoyed a 10.7% reduction.

How can researchers explain these results?

There is a naturally-occurring compound in the gut called butyrate. Butyrate may positively impact insulin sensitivity. When insulin sensitivity is improved, the body does a better job of regulating blood sugar and is able to keep blood sugar levels lower.

While this single study does not prove cause-and effect, it is a starting point for additional research.

So how do you find the right probiotic?

While probiotics do naturally occur in several foods, some find it helpful to take a probiotic supplement.

The happy probiotic

This Premium Probiotic Helps Restore Your Gut Balance

 

Probiotics are safe for most people, although individuals with immune disorders or other serious health conditions may need special consideration. You should always consult with your physician prior to starting new supplements or medications.

When first starting probiotic supplements, you may experience temporary bloating, upset stomach, gas, or diarrhea. These symptoms should resolve within a few days as your digestive system regulates.

Make sure the bottle label states “shelf stable” or “refrigeration not required.” If not, you will have to keep your probiotics in the refrigerator to prevent the bacteria from expiring.

Also check the label for potential allergens like dairy, wheat, soy, and gluten. Make sure you are getting a quality probiotic.

Hopefully, you will soon be on your way to a happier gut and a healthier body with the help of probiotics!

 

Sources:

http://www.livescience.com/56861-probiotics-blood-sugar-dash-diet.html

draxe.com/probiotics-benefits-foods-supplements/

https://authoritynutrition.com/11-super-healthy-probiotic-foods/

up4probiotics.com/4-key-tips-choosing-probiotic/

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The Good “Bugs” That Lower Blood Sugar Naturally https://diabetickitchen.com/the-good-bugs-that-lower-blood-sugar-naturally/ https://diabetickitchen.com/the-good-bugs-that-lower-blood-sugar-naturally/#respond Mon, 21 Mar 2016 16:05:33 +0000 http://diabetickitchen.com/?p=2379

Why Probiotics Are a Must for Type 2 Diabetics… Share

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Why Probiotics Are a Must for Type 2 Diabetics…

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